Career Change: 3 Tips to Get Traction

traction

Does the following sound like something you’ve said?

I want to change jobs or industries but I don’t want to take a cut in pay. I want to move to a different part of the country – or world – but I refuse to pay for relocation. I want to improve my circumstances, but I don’t want it to be uncomfortable, or hard. I know I’m smart, have proven myself and have a lot to offer, so changing my job, and my life, shouldn’t be that difficult.

If so, you may want to recalibrate your expectations and plot a new map for your career change journey.

While major career and life shifts sometimes happen unintentionally and with little perceived effort or investment, the likelihood of this happening, and with the right results, is small. In fact, most times what appears as luck is actually a mix of opportunity intersecting with preparedness.

Rather than getting yourself all in a dither regarding the exact “how” to untangle your current unhappy situation, consider the actionable baby steps you can take, promptly, and just start. In other words, accept the fact that you may not find a perfect route with the perfect salary at the perfect company, but instead, you may need to make a move closer to that ‘lighted path,’ before you understand what the next move is, then the next, and the next.

Doing so, you will ultimately find your way to that virtual ‘light at the end of the tunnel.” Following are three such action steps you can do this week to gain prompt traction!

1. Avoid Analysis Paralysis By Applying to a Few Opportunities, Now. If you feel stuck in toxicity at work, then do something that feels tangible. For example, if you want a job at a specific company, send a resume there. Even getting a rejection letter (or in some cases, no response) is better than doing nothing. In other words, the energy vibe you will feel – the palpable traction – will be invigorating mentally, emotionally and even physically. The act of composing a cover letter and focusing yourself on an action that may potentially resolve your work discord is empowering.

Follow this link for 2 more career change tips: 3 Ways to Plot a New Career Change.


Written by Jacqui Barrett-Poindexter, Partner/Owner, CareerTrend.net
I am a career writer hired by individuals and organizations to build game-changing stories for executives, professionals and entrepreneurs. To find out how I can support your personal or corporate storytelling goals, please follow this link: www.careertrend.net.

Don’t Expect Anyone to Be Your Savior + 4 More Job Seeker Tips

file5161260579824

Calling or emailing your friends, family and colleagues when you are looking for a new job may seem like the natural route. In fact, many experts say, if you know how to concisely guide people to help you, you should do just that.

However, like any advice, you should use discernment before applying it to your life.

With the wide-open Internet forum and the ease and speed with which we are able to ping, email, send instant messages and privately or publicly reach out to one or a thousand people in a single ‘shot,’ individuals in job search not only are overwhelmed, but also are overly eager to get traction in a way that may not be in their long-term best interests.

Following are five tips regarding what not to do when conducting your job search, particularly because these behaviors may turn off just those people you intend to appeal to (and who might even be able to help).

1. Don’t forward your resume to all of your friends, family and colleagues with a request they pass it on to someone they know looking for your expertise in financial management, start-up retail operations, product development or whatever. Instead, research the types of companies and individuals for whom you can articulate a specific, proven solution to their problems and then find a no-pressure way to present your solution. Then, take your foot off the gas – step away, relieve them from your emotional push to have them help you.

2. Don’t apply to a company and then name-drop your friend’s name that works there without their permission. This one speaks for itself.

3. Don’t partner with a resume strategist and expect them to be your savior. As well, since their primary role is to pull together the intimately fine threads of your career story, don’t stonewall them from your achievement details.

Moreover, seeking out a career storyteller who will also hook you up with a recruiter is probably not a valuable use of your or their energy.

While some recruiters have successfully stepped into the resume-writing field, straddling the two distinct, yet complementary sectors, in most instances, that is not the case. Ultra focused on best practices for building compelling and layered career stories and constantly sharpening their marketing communications tools, resume strategists would find their performance plummet if they concurrently spent the necessary time and intellectual effort required to unearth the right recruiter with the current, perfect-fit opening for you.

Please follow this link for two more job seeker tips: 5 Things Not to Do During Your Job Search.


Copyright: Jacqui Barrett-Poindexter, Partner/Owner, CareerTrend.net
I am a career writer hired by individuals and organizations to build game-changing stories for executives, professionals and entrepreneurs. To find out how I can support your personal or corporate storytelling goals, please follow this link: www.careertrend.net.

Resume Story – How to Emote Tenacity

tenacity-2

How to Write Who You Are

Similarly, when writing your career story, you must, “Write who you are.”

As who you are evolves, so does your story.

While being authentic in expressing who you are is important, it is equally essential to be selective in what you parlay versus creating a tell-all story.

As in any marketing communication, your story must be choreographed with relevant moves for your target audience. Before you begin shuffling words across the page, you must understand the characteristics and needs of your focus industry, company and/or leadership.

Dive into and begin collecting nuggets of information about that audience, often buried among an ocean of Internet and news data. Sort through it. Create a loose map of requirements and soft skills you might need to appeal to them.

Next, open up a Word document or simply take a tablet and a pen, and start listing top-of-mind corporate war stories in which you participated that pained you at the time but which you are particularly proud of participating in, now.

Resurrect–with emotional vigor–your thoughts, feelings and intimate project details; remember the pain, emoting it onto the page.

If you saved the day, or were part of a team that did, jot it down. The time you talked another staff member down from abandoning a program ship, influenced a manager to buy-into a new idea or diplomatically and successfully pressed the owner that the marketing project he saw no value in was crucial–go there.

Revive your recall, in living color.

How to Woo Your Audience

As you go through this process, some of your stories may reach a dead end or feel lackluster by the time you’re through processing. Scrap those. Other stories may reveal powerful outcomes that you had forgotten. Keep those.

For some stories, the outcome may not be extraordinary, but the path getting there revealed something impressive or important (or both) about your values, your personality culture, your tenacity (or whatever), that you will want to keep. It adds texture to your story, enticing your reader to know more.

Finally, compare those stories to the needs of the target audience you so thoroughly researched earlier. Whittle down your stories a bit further, being careful you don’t cut out the meat or the heart of who you are.

~~~
Originally published on LinkedIn.

Copyright: Jacqui Barrett-Poindexter, Partner/Owner, CareerTrend.net
I am a career writer hired by individuals and organizations to build game-changing stories for executives, professionals and entrepreneurs. To find out how I can support your personal or corporate storytelling goals, please follow this link: www.careertrend.net.

Page 6 of 114« First...45678...203040...Last »