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Executive Job Seeker: Is Your Career Portfolio Current?

image: b_d_solis (flickr)

By Jacqui Barrett-Poindexter

The complexity of an executive’s career message can be clarified through a rich process of career archaeology. This rugged process unearths a multiplicity of career stories that have become buried in the recesses of your memory as you become entrenched in today’s, tomorrow’s and other ‘future’ challenges.

The value of these processes, as well as ‘how to start’ and ‘what career portfolio items’ you should choose to highlight your executive talent during career search are explained in my newest blog post over at TalentCulture: “What to Include in Your Executive Career Portfolio.” I invite you to visit my latest contribution as we explore the value proposition vehicles necessary to drive your executive job search.

Executive Resumes: Unique Career Vessels

Recently I was honored when Susan Ireland, author of The Complete Idiot’s Guide to the Perfect Resume, and a friend on Twitter. asked me to contribute to a blog post about executive resumes. Specifically, she challenged me to answer the question: “What makes an executive resume different from other resumes?”

Though my 13-years’ resume writing experience shows professional- and executive-level resumes share many characteristics, I strongly believe MORE is expected of the executives’ career contributions, and as such, more is expected of the executive resume.

In short, the executive resume is the career vessel in which a plethora of critical career victories and breakthroughs are housed!

For my complete response over at Susan’s blog, please click HERE.

Jacqui Barrett-Poindexter, Master Resume Writer

Does your job currency stand out like a shiny coin?

According to Altan Khendup, senior technology leader, strategist and advocate in Silicon Valley, California, when people think you’re interesting, they start listening; they become engaged, and then you can inject your pitch and your value.

I’ve had the pleasure of keeping in touch with this forward-thinking technology leader (oh, and by the way, a client of mine!) for the past nine months. An active Tweeter, blogger and LinkedIn contributor, Altan is a remarkable example of proactive career management!

His steady stream of high-level career conversations, interviews and job offers have mounted as he charts his course for the next career destination—on a given day, he receives up to 12 opportunities. Among his interview opportunities, Altan has collaborated with key technology innovators as well as large, Fortune 100 companies.

His luxury of cherry picking from opportunity inquires from a plethora of executive recruiters, HR professionals and direct company principals may seem a bit unexpected during this tough economy. In one recent instance, a company even offered Altan the opportunity to create his own job description.

Fundamental to Altan’s recent career search advancements are the following:

1. Articulating (with my help) his ‘complete story’– finely focused and value-driven resume, cover letter and power statements that are consistent with what Altan wants to be.

2. Creating a digital footprint, including blog, LinkedIn profile and Twitter account, among other social media venues.

3. Actively engaging on Twitter: Tweeting meaningful, value-driven contributions, which resulted in a major technology innovator inviting him to discuss a job opportunity after they followed his tweets about some of the technology they were interested in.

4. Selectively targeting / attending various meet-ups and unconferences and actively engaging in social networking discussions.

5. Spending the appropriate level of time and attention on company research before engaging in written and spoken conversations.

In your career,”you will eventually hit choppy waters, and you must prepare for it,” says Altan.

Hope for the best and prepare for the worst; anticipate it’s (lay off) going to happen and take steps to manage the change. These are career survival movements you must take, not just to succeed, but to thrive in this economic downturn … or virtually any economic climate.

“If you’re not prepared with excellent job currency (resume, power statements, blog, LinkedIn profile, etc.), how do you expect to compete with 10 million others?” asserts Altan.

For Altan, who seeks higher level positions, the principals reviewing his resume are accustomed to advanced-level resumes and will have doubts about his qualifications if his career positioning documents fall short.

“Having job currency that is valuable is key. Even with initial introductions, a resume is the common job currency that is requested, and you must make it look like an investment.

Continues Altan, “If you invest $2,000 and it helps you land a $150,000 job, then it’s done its work. I’m not saying your resume will physically go to meetings for you and introduce you, or will do your social networking. It’s a tool (like a power saw that cuts wood) – $50 saw vs. $500 saw – sooner or later you’ll have to look at that tool and say, ‘Is it worth buying the right one – or any one?”

“All of these are tools, part of the process, part of the journey.”

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