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Resume Story – How to Emote Tenacity

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How to Write Who You Are

Similarly, when writing your career story, you must, “Write who you are.”

As who you are evolves, so does your story.

While being authentic in expressing who you are is important, it is equally essential to be selective in what you parlay versus creating a tell-all story.

As in any marketing communication, your story must be choreographed with relevant moves for your target audience. Before you begin shuffling words across the page, you must understand the characteristics and needs of your focus industry, company and/or leadership.

Dive into and begin collecting nuggets of information about that audience, often buried among an ocean of Internet and news data. Sort through it. Create a loose map of requirements and soft skills you might need to appeal to them.

Next, open up a Word document or simply take a tablet and a pen, and start listing top-of-mind corporate war stories in which you participated that pained you at the time but which you are particularly proud of participating in, now.

Resurrect–with emotional vigor–your thoughts, feelings and intimate project details; remember the pain, emoting it onto the page.

If you saved the day, or were part of a team that did, jot it down. The time you talked another staff member down from abandoning a program ship, influenced a manager to buy-into a new idea or diplomatically and successfully pressed the owner that the marketing project he saw no value in was crucial–go there.

Revive your recall, in living color.

How to Woo Your Audience

As you go through this process, some of your stories may reach a dead end or feel lackluster by the time you’re through processing. Scrap those. Other stories may reveal powerful outcomes that you had forgotten. Keep those.

For some stories, the outcome may not be extraordinary, but the path getting there revealed something impressive or important (or both) about your values, your personality culture, your tenacity (or whatever), that you will want to keep. It adds texture to your story, enticing your reader to know more.

Finally, compare those stories to the needs of the target audience you so thoroughly researched earlier. Whittle down your stories a bit further, being careful you don’t cut out the meat or the heart of who you are.

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Originally published on LinkedIn.

Copyright: Jacqui Barrett-Poindexter, Partner/Owner, CareerTrend.net
I am a career writer hired by individuals and organizations to build game-changing stories for executives, professionals and entrepreneurs. To find out how I can support your personal or corporate storytelling goals, please follow this link: www.careertrend.net.

Stop Being So Boring + 4 More Things to Quit Doing on Your Resume

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5 Things Not to Do on Your Resume

1. List every task you perform. If your role as an administrative assistant requires you handle everything from preparing coffee in the morning to collaborating with your boss on financial reports in the afternoon, then focus on the report creating and not the coffee making. Resumes are strategic marketing pieces aimed at selling your value, not a laundry list of duties.

2. Forget to Connect the Dots for the Reader. Once you’ve identified strategic report building as an important resume add, you must then translate the value of the financial reports to the reader. Pave a path that begins with your role in gathering data from department managers, organizing that information into a meaningful Excel spreadsheet and then plotting out charts and graphs.

Show how those reports and graphs helped whomever was reviewing the reports make better decisions in regard to sales goals, customer relationship management or cost cutting, whatever the case may be.

What you are trying to succinctly, yet meaningfully accomplish is show the person reading your resume ‘why’ your experience building reports benefited your current company, and how it will likewise, benefit them.

Ideally, you will paint a picture of how your contribution was essential to the organization achieving specific, quantifiable ($ or # or %) growth goals.

3. Be Boring. Using the same word to begin each sentence; i.e., “developed” this; “developed” that feel tedious and blah to most readers. The role of a resume is more than just checking off a requirement in your job search. Instead, the resume must also prove out your abilities to communicate effectively, and with verve.

So, when you find your words repeating, make an effort to embolden your language with synonyms that stir senses. You may even find that restructuring sentences and paragraphs will help organically reduce the number of repeating words. For example, instead of saying, “developed new team approach with expanded communications,” you might instead lead with, “positioned company for double-digit customer increase by driving new team approach with expanded communications … etc.”

Follow this link for 2 more things ‘not’ to do on your resume: 5 Things Not To Do On Your Resume.


 

© Jacqui Barrett-Poindexter, Partner/Owner, CareerTrend.net
I am a career writer hired by individuals and organizations to build game-changing stories for executives, professionals and entrepreneurs. To find out how I can support your personal or corporate storytelling goals, please follow this link: www.careertrend.net.

Transcendent Resume :: Beyond Your Threshold of Pain

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Everything that you’ve done up to this point leads to this single sweet spot; and it is here that you … become the strongest version of yourself. 

via The Transcendent Rep 
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While many career bloggers wring their hands about resume length, fonts and keywords, I get all ‘jazz hands’ over more enriching and meaningful details.

If you are ready to move beyond the tactics and transcend an ordinary resume message, then read further.

During a recent weight training workout, I was captivated by a 3-minute message by Strength Camp called, The Transcendent Rep. While the video (scroll to the end of this post to view) is a kick-in-the hiney message for all of us fitness-aspiring folks, the message equally applies to careerists seeking a more sinewy resume representing the delicately powerful and nuanced fibers of their career muscle.

In other words, by focusing on the complexity of your career story versus contracting your experience to achieve a quick+easy resume template type process, you create a more palpable, powerful outcome.

By fully involving yourself in this transformative resume process, you will get sweaty — the intellectual perspiration dripping from your virtual forehead — as you are consumed gathering up career thoughts and recollections.

It requires your participation, your focus, a workout of your mind to lift up messages pressed down by the weight of time. It requires your vision to unpack the achievements of yesterday and push them through the marketing funnel of the future you.

At some point, in fact, the rigor may feel like too much, and you’ll want to liberate yourself by outsourcing your mental labor.

Don’t give up that power.

The threshold moment you eventually will experience may make or break your next career move. It depends upon your initiative to push yourself one more emotional rep beyond what you want.

This threshold moment, when crossed, will instantly make your story  — and you — a better version of yourself.

You will break through a fortress, and within that fortress will be “jewels of untold value that will instantly turn you into a brand new person.”

(Disclosure: The short video, while inspiring, has one instance of profanity, should that impact your decision to view it.)


 

© Jacqui Barrett-Poindexter, Partner/Owner, CareerTrend.net
I am a career writer hired by individuals and organizations to build game-changing stories for executives, professionals and entrepreneurs. To find out how I can support your personal or corporate storytelling goals, please follow this link: www.careertrend.net.

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